Thursday, December 6, 2007

New Ship on the Header - USS Delaware

This ship was actually the fourth in the US Navy to be named USS Delaware. She was a 375-ton sidewheel steamer, 161' x 27', with a six foot draft. She was a rather fast vessel, capable of 13 knots and carried a crew of 65 officers and men. She was armed with four 32-pounders (smoothbore) and a 12-pounder rifle of unspecified design. She was built in 1861 in Wilmington, Delaware and purchased by the US Navy in October of that year.

The ship was commanded by Lt. S.P. Quackenbush and assigned to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, sailing from Philadelphia in December 1861. She patrolled the North Carolina coast from January-May 1862 and participated in a number of engagements in coastal waters in association with the Burnside Expedition, including the capture of New Bern in March. She then saw service in Virginia waters from June-October, when she made her way back to coastal North Carolina. For the remainder of the war this pattern of operations continued, splitting time between Virginia and North Carolina. At war's end she reported to the Washington Navy Yard, was decommissioned and sold to the US Treasury Department.

4 comments:

Drew W. said...

Andrew,
Did that viewing problem you had earlier with the header resolve itself?

Wade said...

Andrew,

The U.S.S. Delaware was one of the numerous ships in support of the buildup of forces and logistics in support of Sherman's pending arrival at Goldsboro.

I have her in my log of vessel flow coming into the port of Morehead City on March 8th, 1865.

Good to see a picture of her.

Wade

Andrew Duppstadt said...

Drew,
It's obviously an issue with the browser on my personal laptop. My computer at work doesn't have the same issue as my personal one. I'm wondering if I need to upgrade to IE7 (which is what I have on the computer at work). I definitely have no real idea of what's going on.

Andrew Duppstadt said...

Wade,
The Delaware was in and out of NC waters throughout the war. Its interesting to read the history of the ship.